Love

Moved with Compassion

A few years ago while attending a conference I had an experience that changed my view of the world forever.  I was sitting in the very back row of the balcony of venue watching a video that had been produced to raise awareness regarding the plight of children living in extreme poverty.  The scene was a relatively busy city street.  The time stamp said it was about 8p.  A little girl no more than 10 years old entered the frame carrying some blankets and a pillow.  I watched as she meticulously made a little place to sleep on that busy street.  She spread out the blankets very carefully, lining the edges up neatly.  Then put her tattered and dirty purple and pink pillow down, curled up under the top blanket and went to sleep.  The whole time you could see feet walking by.  No one stopped.  Cut to 9:10p.  The girl seems to be sleeping soundly.  Feet still walk past.  None of them break stride.  They continue past.  Cut to 10:42p.  The girl stirs a little.  She’s trying to find a more comfortable position on that cold hard pavement.  More feet pass.  Feet keep walking past.  They never stop.  As I write this remembering the images, I’m almost in tears again.

That video created a visceral feeling in the pit of my stomach.  Ever since then, my wife and I have made a point to give financially to organizations that help provide for little girls like that.  As a member of the Ann Arbor West Rotary Club, I am currently working on two projects that will help little girls like that.

Have you ever had that feeling in the pit of your stomach?  That feeling of sorrow and pain for someone else?

I think Jesus had a feeling like when he saw the crowds of people that gathered when he taught.  In Matthew 9:36, it says that Jesus had compassion for or was moved with compassion for the crowds.  In the original language that word describes an emotion that creates a visceral response.  When he saw all the people looking for someone to believe in, someone to follow, someone in whom they could trust, Jesus felt like I did watching that video of the little girl.  It was for them, for us, that he came, lived, taught, died, and rose again.  He did that out of love.  He was moved with compassion.

How should this inform the life of the Christ-follower?

When’s the last time you were moved with compassion?  When was the last time you saw an injustice and felt in the pit of your stomach that something must be done to fix it?

The world is full of injustice.  Full of evil.  Full of sin.

The good news of Jesus Christ is that he came to right the wrongs, heal the sick, free those in bondage (both spiritually and physically).  God sent Jesus to do that.  Jesus is sending his church to continue on the mission that he started while he was here.

This is what it means to be the “body of Christ” (1 Corinthians 12:27).  As his body, we are to continue to do the work that he started.  This is how we spread the Gospel, the good news of Jesus Christ.

If we’re not actively working to spread the Kingdom of God by eliminating sin and evil in the world, we are not following Jesus.  We should be moved with compassion to do something to fight the evil that is rampant in this world.  This is what it means to be a disciple of Jesus.

What moves you with compassion?

Challenging the Institution

A young man from Montana who had gathered a small following of farmers and ranchers burst into the U.S. Capitol building the morning of the President’s State of the Union address. The young man with a burning passion bordering on manic rage began shouting and screaming and chased the lobbyists out of the Capitol building. He was fed up with the lobby system in the country. He felt that lobbyists, funded by wealthy individuals and organizations of both the liberal and conservative persuasions, were ruining the American political system. Because of the huge amounts of money these lobbyists were able to bring to bear in support of their specific issue the young man believed that the common man, the people Congress was elected to represent, no longer had a voice in their government. At the top of his lungs he shouted, “The Constitution provides for a Congress to represent the people in government, but you have turned it into an auction for the rich buying votes like they buy art!”

Now, this isn’t intended as a political statement. It is the closest contemporary illustration I could come up with to describe what Jesus did when he cleansed temple in Jerusalem.

On the busiest day in Jerusalem, when the Jewish people were traveling there to celebrate the Passover (one of the most important Jewish religious holidays), Jesus walks into the Temple, the center of Jewish worship.

In the Temple, there were people selling animals for sacrifice and changing Roman coins for Jewish ones. Like lobbying, this system of selling animals and changing money was intended to help the common people. It was a lot of work and money to transport animals for sacrifice to Jerusalem. The Roman coins were stamped with images of gods or the emperor and were considered improper to give in worship (this had to do with the prohibition on worshipping images). The farther one lived from Jerusalem, the center of Jewish culture and commerce, the harder it was to find Jewish coins. Those “selling oxen and sheep and pigeons and the money-changers” were there providing a service.

The problem was the people providing the service had corrupted the service. Like any vacation destination today the prices changed based on the anticipated volume of business. Basic economics, when the demand goes up and the supply doesn’t change the price goes up. This was a particular burden on the poor. Not only had it cost them a lot to travel to Jerusalem to attend the Passover celebration now they had to pay inflated fees for the sacrifices necessary to participate. Which, by the way, violated Jewish religious Law. According to the Old Testament, the rich were expected to share their Passover sacrifice and feast with the poor. The system intended to help the common people became institutionalized oppression of the poor.

Another issue with the animal-sellers and money-changers was the location in which they set up shop. They set up shop in the Temple. They were selling and changing money in what was called the Court of the Gentiles. This was the only area in the Temple where non-Jewish worshippers of the Jewish God, called “God-Fearers”, were allowed to worship. By setting up their kiosks there, the shop-keepers and money-changers were preventing the God-Fearers from worshipping God. The system intended to help the common people became institutionalized racism.

Jesus saw this and was enraged. I imagine him seething as he walked through the Temple court observing this institutionalized oppression and racism. The Bible says that as he fumed he found three strips of leather and wove together a whip. Once he had finished the whip he used it to chase out the people oppressing the poor and preventing the racial minority from worshipping God. As he did he shouted “How dare you turn my Father’s house into a market!” (John 2:16b).

Jesus saw institutionalized sin and challenged it. He would not let it stand.

How should this inform the life of the Christ-follower?

Institutionalized sin is real. It can be seen in countries that don’t allow girls to be educated. It can be seen in governments that imprison people for religious or political reasons. It can be seen in corporations that turn a blind eye to violations of human dignity to save money on materiels. Institutionalized sin is real and it’s prevalent.

When Jesus saw institutionalized sin he challenged it. When Christ-followers see institutionalized sin we should challenge it.

What are some ways you can think of to challenge institutionalized sin?

Symbols of Sin Become Symbols of Joy

According to the Gospel of John, Jesus’ first miracle was one of his most famous and has become one of the most controversial. At some point early in his public ministry, Jesus and his disciples are invited to a wedding. If the accounts that I’ve read are accurate the first century Jews knew how to party. You’ve never experienced a party like a Jewish wedding in first century Palestine.

The wedding in the town of Cana would have been no different. Spirits were high and the wine was flowing. And therein lies the problem. The wine was flowing faster than the host intended. They ran out of wine before the party was over and this was a major faux pas.

This is where Jesus comes in. Jesus didn’t want the party or the host’s reputation to be ruined. Not far from where Jesus was standing when he heard the news were several large ceramic barrels used for ceremonial washing. You see, not only were the first century Jews great partiers, they were also spiritual hypochondriacs. They lived in a constant state of fear of becoming spiritually impure. (This is an issue that Jesus will address repeatedly in his ministry.)

The guests of the party used this water to wash their hands before they ate to ensure that they consumed no spiritual impurities. This hand-washing was not just good hygiene. This was religious ritual cleansing.

This water represented a way of relating to God that Jesus came to renew and improve upon. This water was symbol of why people don’t experience the love of God the way he intends. This water is a symbol of sin and evil and all the bad things we deal with because of sin and evil in the world.

Jesus takes this symbol of sin and how humanity isn’t experiencing God’s love and changes is to wine. That’s pretty impressive in and of itself. Changing water into wine is almost as good as walking on water (we’ll get to that on later.) Yet changing water to wine so that the party could continue is only a small part of what Jesus is doing.

For first century Jews, wine is a symbol of joy and God’s favor. Jesus took the symbol of religious fear and the consequences of sin and changed it to a symbol of joy. Jesus took something that reminded people that they couldn’t live up to God’s standards and changed it into something that reminded them that God loves them. One of the biggest transitions that Jesus leads us through as faith in God transitions from the Old Covenant to the New, from Mosaic Judaism to Christianity is the transition from focusing on the need to be restored to God to focusing on God’s love that restores humanity to him.

That’s really the story of the Bible. God created humanity to express his love to us. The first humans and every human after rejected this love by choosing to love themselves more than God. God desperately wants to restore his relationship with humanity. God sent Jesus to restore that relationship. We can experience the love of God through Jesus.

Jesus’ first miracle was a symbol of that story. He took a symbol that represented how we are missing out on God and changed it to a symbol of joy and God’s love.

How should this inform the life of the Christ-follower?

All around us there are ceremonial washing vessels. There are symbols of sin and our separation from the love of God. They can be seen in poverty, racism, disease, suffering, hatred, anger … do I need to go on? As Christ-followers, we can’t let the symbols stand. We need to actively transform these symbols to something else. We need change these symbols to symbols of love and joy. We need to show people they can experience God’s love. We do this by expressing it.

Earlier this week, I saw a news story of a New York City police officer who did just this. He saw a homeless man sitting on the street without any shoes. On a whim he went into a shoe store close by and bought a pair of shoes for the man. He then went to the man and put shoes and socks on the man.

Very few things reveal the reality of sin and pain in the world that a homeless person who cannot even find shoes in the winter. Very few things express God’s love more than putting shoes on the feet of someone who desperately needs them. This police officer transformed a symbol of sin into a symbol of joy and peace.

May we all open our eyes and see the world the way this officer does, the way Jesus does, and may we transform symbols of sin and evil into symbols of joy and peace by expressing God’s love to a world that desperately needs it.

Jesus in Cloud City

After Jesus was baptized he went into the “wilderness” to be “tempted.” This is kind of a strange story to me. Throughout the Bible we’re admonished to avoid temptation. A few pages later in the story Jesus is going to tell us to pray that God will keep us from temptation and evil. Yet, Jesus is intentionally walking alone into a place where he will be tempted.

It’s like a scene from a movie. The hero, Jesus, has just been introduced as the hero and the one who will defeat evil. Usually at this point in the story the hero knows just enough to be dangerous. And the hero, prematurely, heads into battle virtually assured a sound thrashing. It’s Luke Skywalker heading to Cloud City to face Darth Vader before he’s ready. In the movies the hero is always defeated. Fortunately for us this isn’t a movie.

Jesus isn’t defeated. Satan does his best to tempt Jesus. But Jesus wins. I’m confident I would have failed the test. I would have failed the first temptation. Jesus didn’t. Jesus never sinned.

So what? Who cares? Why is this important? Looking at the story 2000 years later, with two millennia of church history and theology behind us, it’s no surprise that the God-man didn’t sin. He’s Jesus. Of course he didn’t sin. He’s the guy that really did walk on water.

It’s important because he experienced what we experience. There is no temptation that you or I have ever experienced that Jesus didn’t experience. Every temptation I face Jesus has experienced it. Every temptation you face Jesus has experienced it. Don’t believe me? Take a break and read 1 Corinthians 10:13 and Hebrews 4:15. Jesus faced it all. He faced more and worse than you and I ever will because he faced it all.

Most of the books I’ve read and lessons I’ve heard emphasize Jesus’ success in facing temptation. They focus on Jesus’ magnificence and his divine strength. Or, the focus on his strategy in facing temptation as a model for us. Both of these things are incredibly important, but there’s something even more important.

He was tempted.

Jesus was really tempted.

The temptations weren’t imaginary. They weren’t merely annoying hoops to jump through so that he could get on to the important work of dying and resurrecting. Jesus faced temptation. He knows what it’s like to be tempted. When I’m tempted, Jesus knows what it feels like. When your tempted, Jesus knows what it feels like.

By being baptized, Jesus identified with us. By being tempted, Jesus learned to empathize with us.

How should this inform the life of a Christ-follower?

Empathy is underrated. Empathy is important. Empathy is what moves us from merely identifying with the people around us to loving the people around us. Empathy is a necessary component to loving our neighbor as ourselves, particularly when our neighbor is different from us. Empathy is necessary to express God’s love.

Oftentimes, Christ-followers forget how important it is to empathize with people who don’t know Jesus. We have a penchant for looking down on people that don’t conform to our social/moral standards, whether they’re really Jesus’ standards or not.

We forget that sin is sin is sin. The drug addicted homeless person pan-handling downtown or the power-addicted CEO that ignores that pan-handler everyday as they walk to their office is no worse than you. The fact is, we all have sinned. We’re all tempted. We all need Jesus.

Jesus knows what it’s like to be tempted. Jesus empathizes with us when we’re tempted. Jesus empathizes with them when they’re tempted. Jesus models for us that we need to empathize with people different from us. It’s vital to expressing God’s love.

What barriers do you think people face when it comes to empathizing with others.

Baptism = Identity

This week we’re continuing are discussion on the key moments of Jesus’ life and how they teach us to live the Jesus-life. The second event we’ll discuss is his baptism. For those of you playing at home you can find the story in Matthew 3:13-17; Mark 1:9-11; Luke 3:21-22; and John 1:31-34.

First, I think it’s important to clarify what baptism is. There are a lot of arguments in the church world about who should get baptized and the proper way to baptise people. I’m not going to get into that argument here. It’s not really relevant for this conversation. In first century Palestine, there were a lot of baptisms. They all seem to have two things in common.

(1) They were all ritual cleansings. When an individual was baptized they were admitting that they were impure in some way and needed to be cleansed of the impurity. The baptism actually or symbolically cleansed them from the impurity. (There is some debate among scholars regarding to what degree people considered the baptism actually cleansing or symbolically representing cleansing that had happened. I won’t bet into it here. What all agree on is that the cleansing originated in God.)

(2) Baptism involved identification with a group of people. The Dead Sea Scrolls tell of people joining the community of Qumran being baptized. The immediate context of Jesus’ baptism is the ministry of John the Baptist. You can read his story in if you look just before the passages about Jesus’ baptism listed above. I’ll summarize it here. John’s message was repent because God’s Messiah is on the way. Repent means to turn away from or give up something. Among first century Jews, this something was always sin. Those who repented were baptized to show this repentance and identify with the people who were ready to accept the Messiah that John would show them. It’s important to note here that the religious elite did not repent and receive John’s baptism. The reason seems to be that they did not accept that they needed to repent of anything because they followed their religious rules.

Into this context steps Jesus and he asks to be baptized by John. It begs the question, why? It can’t have been for cleansing. Jesus was pure. He never sinned. He is the only one to ever live a life without sin.

No, it wasn’t about cleansing. It was about identification. By being baptized, Jesus was identifying himself with the people who need to repent. Jesus was joining the “I know I’m a sinner and need to repent” group, even though that was not true about him.

The incarnation taught us that Jesus came to be with us because he loves us. Jesus’ baptism shows us he didn’t just come to live among us. He identified with us.

An example of the difference between living among and identifying with can be seen in the story of Hudson Taylor and the China Inland Mission. In the late 19th century many western missionaries traveled to China to share the story of Jesus. Most maintained their western culture and lifestyle while in China. They wore western clothes and ate western food. They lived among the Chinese people but did not identify with them. Hudson Taylor broke ranks. He identified with the Chinese people. He wore Chinese clothes. He ate Chinese food. He did everything he could to become Chinese. Who do you think the Chinese people trusted more? Who do you think was able to share more about Jesus?

How should this inform the life of a Christ-follower?

It’s not enough to live around and associate with people who don’t know Jesus. We have to identify with them. We have to become like them to the extent we can while continuing to honor the example and teachings of Jesus. We need to become part of the town we live in. We need to become part of our neighborhoods. We need to celebrate when they celebrate. We need to cry when they cry. We should be so embedded in, so connected to our communities that we’re missed when we’re not there.

Here are a couple of things that we do to identify with our community. We try to never turn down an invitation. If someone invites us to something we make every effort to attend. We are very involved with our daughter’s school. We care what’s going on there and are always available to help out. We invite people over to our house a lot. We host parties and have people over for dinner or to watch the game. We’re doing these things to identify with our neighborhood. We’re new to Ann Arbor and are working hard to become locals.

What ideas do you have for identifying with your community?

Incarnation: A Fancy Word for Living in the Neighborhood

This week we’re going to start a new series. In our Open Letter we said we’re about Jesus. In our Introduction Video I said we were about “living the Jesus life.” That begs the question, “What does it mean to be ‘about Jesus’ and ‘live the Jesus life’?” The best way to answer that, I think, is to look at Jesus and his life. In this series we’ll take a look at the 12 most significant moments in Jesus’ life and how they should inform the life of a Christ-follower.

Jesus is Born
The first has to be his birth. The Gospels of Matthew and Luke both have great birth narratives. My favorite, however, is the one found in the Gospel of John (probably not surprising since my dissertation is on John’s writings). Here’s how John tells the story of Jesus birth:

In the beginning the Word already existed.
The Word was with God,
and the Word was God.
He existed in the beginning with God.
God created everything through him,
and nothing was created except through him.
The Word gave life to everything that was created,
and his life brought light to everyone.
The light shines in the darkness,
and the darkness can never extinguish it. …

He came into the very world he created, but the world didn’t recognize him. He came to his own people, and even they rejected him. But to all who believed him and accepted him, he gave the right to become children of God. They are reborn—not with a physical birth resulting from human passion or plan, but a birth that comes from God.
So the Word became human and made his home among us. He was full of unfailing love and faithfulness. And we have seen his glory, the glory of the Father’s one and only Son (John 1:1-5, 10-14).

Jesus has existed eternally as the second part of the Trinity. He is God. Always has been. Always will be. At a point in history, about 2015 years ago, Jesus was born into this world as a human baby. The theological term for this is the Incarnation.

How should this inform the life of a Christ-follower?
The incarnation leads us to talk about living incarnationally. Jesus chose to enter into the lives and stories of people. He chose this for one reason, to reveal God. He chose to live among us as one of us to express God’s love to us.

Living the Jesus life, being about Jesus, means living incarnationally. An outside observer of Christians in America may be led to believe that the goal of Christianity is to get people to spend as much time as possible in a church building and get them to invite others to do the same.

Now let me clearly state, there is nothing wrong with attending church services. Nor is there anything wrong with attending activities that take place in a church building. I just don’t think that should be the goal of individual Christ-followers or churches.

The incarnation teaches us that we should live among the people that Jesus created and loves and express God’s love to them. If our only friends are other Christ-followers, if all of our activities revolve around a building where religious services are held, if our only goal for others is to get them to got to the same building, we’re missing the lesson of the incarnation. We need to get out among people that Jesus loves at work, at PTO meetings, at social gatherings, in bars and coffee houses and express God’s love. Just like Jesus did.

Where do you think the best place to express God’s love to people who don’t know him would be?

Ending Hunger One Step at a Time

We’re taking a break from the question series to talk about an event in which we’re participating. The Interfaith Council for Justice and Peace is sponsoring the 2012 CROP Hunger Walk. Last year proceeds from the Walk supported local organizations such as the St. Andrew’s Breakfast Program, Avalon Housing, Hope Clinic, Catholic Social Services, and many more.

The vision of Agape Ann Arbor is to be a community experiencing and expressing God’s love. I can’t think of many ways better to express God’s love than by providing someone’s most basic needs. Feeding the hungry is one of the most fundamental ways to express God’s love.

If you take a look in the Bible, you can see God feeding the hungry over and over again. In the very beginning God created the world including plants that produced food for people. He told Adam and Eve that he had provided that food for them (Genesis 2:16). After God freed the nation of Israel from slavery in Egypt, he provided food for them in the desert (Exodus 16). In forming the legal code for Israel God commanded that farmers leave some of their produce in the fields for the poor to harvest so no one would go hungry in Israel (Leviticus 19:9-10 et. al.). Jesus continues this example of feeding the hungry. Twice he stopped what he was doing to feed the people following him (Mark 6:30-39; 8:1-13 and parallels). Jesus said, moreover, that feeding the hungry is one of the expectations of those who are following him; living in his kingdom (Matthew 25:31-46).

We, therefore, are putting our love into action and doing something small to feed the hungry. We would love for you to be a part of our team. If you would like to make a difference and feed the hungry with us go to our team page for the walk and join our team or donate to our team to help us reach our goal.

In the Name of Love

We’re continuing our blog series answering questions that people have asked us. This week we’re taking a break from the theological to answer a more practical question. Why do we call ourselves Agape Ann Arbor? This is probably the easiest question to answer of them all.

The vision of Agape Ann Arbor is to be a community experiencing and expressing God’s love. The foundation of this vision comes from something that Jesus said to his followers the night before he was executed. He said that he was giving them a new command, a new way of life, they were to love each other in the same way that he loved them. Then he said that the world would know they were his followers by their love for one another. In other words, people looking at this new community built around the example and teachings of Jesus would know who they were by the way the experience and express God’s love. The one distinguishing characteristic of Jesus-followers is not what they do on Sunday, who they vote for, what music they listen to, or what books they read. The distinguishing characteristic of Jesus-followers is how they love.

I don’t mean to be overly harsh or critical here but if you call yourself a Jesus-follower and you’re not known for how you love people, you are not following Jesus.

So, back to the name. You didn’t think I forgot did you. That wasn’t some wild ranting rabbit trail. It’s all connected.

Agape, pronounced ah-GAH-pay, is a Greek word that means unconditional love. For the ancient Greeks, agape was the highest possible form of love. The New Testament authors used the word agape to describe the love of God; unconditional, unrelenting, unending, love. We are a community in Ann Arbor seeking to experience and express God’s love. We are Agape Ann Arbor.

Christian Recruiting

At lunch the other day, a friend asked me an interesting question. He asked, “Why do you feel the need to recruit?” Here’s my favorite thing about his question. He used the word recruit. I’ve never heard it put that way before. I’ve heard evangelism (the Christian term of which no one seems to know the definition), outreach (an equally vague bit of Christian jargon), and proselytize (typically used pejoratively by people who are not Christian). But, I’d never heard recruit used in that context before.

As a member of the Michigan Air National Guard, I have a specific view of recruiting. It generally involves a young naive person who is looking for purpose and a job. Someone in a uniform (The Marines always have the advantage at this point.), extols the virtues of serving in the (insert branch of service here) and tries to get them to enlist. The goal for US Military recruiters is to fill the ranks of the US Military.

Living within walking distance of the University of Michigan I’m exposed to another view of recruiting. The NCAA Division I football coach. This conjures up thoughts of middle-aged men with personalities too big for their bodies wearing polo shirts enticing young naive boys to play football at (insert school here). The goal of the college football coach is to get the best talent possible to win football games.

We Christ-followers recruit too. The uniform is different. The recruits are often different. But, most importantly, the motivation is different. When someone chooses to follow Jesus, I get no direct benefit.

OK, you might argue that I get the benefit of people attending Agape Ann Arbor. That’s a fair critique. So, let me answer that before I explain my motivation. First, there is no prerequisite to attend an Agape Ann Arbor gathering. We don’t care what you believe. You’re welcome to hang with. Everyone is welcome. Second for a lot of people who decide to follow Jesus, Agape Ann Arbor isn’t a good fit for them. They’re looking for a church experience very different from our community gatherings. They’re looking for a more typical expression of American church. Agape Ann Arbor is anything but the typical expression of American church. I have a lot of friends who are pastors of different churches. I’m happy to connect new Christ-followers with those communities.

Truly, I don’t get a direct benefit from someone choosing to follow Jesus. So, why do I do it? There are three specific reasons:

First, Jesus changed my life. Jesus has given me direction and a purpose. Through Jesus I experience God’s love. This is the most meaningful thing in my life. I honestly believe that everyone who follows Jesus will have this same transcendant experience. I love people. I want people to be all that God has created them to be and I think that can only happen through Jesus. So, I share Jesus with people hoping they will follow him.

Second, I believe in a literal heaven and hell. I know that’s not a popular belief. According to the statistics I’ve read, I’m in the minority. That’s OK. It’s still true of me. I believe that people have the choice to experience heaven now and forever through Jesus or experience hell now and forever without him. Since I believe this to be true, I believe I would be the biggest selfish jerk on the planet if I didn’t share Jesus.

Third, one of the last things Jesus said to his followers after his resurrection and before he ascended into heaven was to go make disciples. Jesus literally told his followers to go recruit followers. I love Jesus. If you love someone, you do what they ask as a loving response. Since I love Jesus, I do what he asked me to do.

I feel like there’s one thing I need to add to this. People are not projects. I don’t make friends with people to “get them in.” I make friends with people because I love people. If my friends never choose to follow Jesus, it makes me sad because of what I believe about him. But that doesn’t change how I feel or what I believe about them.

If you’re my friend. You’re my friend because I love you and like hanging out with you. Your choice to follow Jesus or not is your choice. That’s between you and Jesus. It does not change the fact that you’re my friend.

I Respect Your Choice

A few weeks ago, I sent a message to many of my Facebook friends asking them, to share one question they would like a pastor to answer about faith or Jesus. I received several great responses. Over the next several weeks I’m going to attempt to answer those questions. I will be as honest and thorough as I can. Due the fact, however, that this is a blog, I’m going to be brief. I want this to be as readable as possible. I will have to leave a lot out. The advantage to this being a blog, though, is that you can interact with us right here. If you want to engage more regarding any of these questions, please jump in. We’d love to talk to you. Also if you have a question you’d like us to address, post it here or contact us through this website. With that said let’s dive in.

One of the most intriguing questions I was asked had to do with why Christians don’t seem to respect the faith choices of others. It made me very sad to read the stories of rejection experienced from people calling themselves Christ-followers. That is completely antithetical to the teachings and actions of Jesus.

Choice is one of the greatest gifts God gave us. It’s central to the story of the Bible and God’s relationship with us. At the very beginning God created humans. God provided everything they needed. He put them in a lush garden that provided all the food they needed. He created two people so that they would have companionship. He gave them meaningful work so that they would have a sense of purpose in life. At that time, in that environment, people had an amazing connection with God. The Bible describes it as that they walked with God in the cool of the day.

I love that imagery. It reminds me of the walks my wife and I used to take in the evening when our daughter was a baby; or walking with my daughter to and from school through the woods, now that she’s older. At those times we have the most amazing conversations. That’s what it was like for the first humans with God.

Now back to choice. Those first humans were given the amazing gift of choice. Most importantly, they had the choice to maintain that relationship with God or to go their own way. Essentially the choice was to let God be their god or choose to make themselves god.

This choice was symbolized by a tree in the center of the garden. It was called the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (different, by the way, from a Tree of Knowledge which is not found anywhere in the Bible; all due respect to Steve Jobs). The only prohibition God placed on the first humans was not to eat the fruit from that tree.

They chose to disobey God. There’s a lot more to the story. But, the result is the same. They used the gift God gave them to choose and they chose themselves over God. One of the lessons of this story is that while the gift of choice is good, not all choices are good. And let’s face it, ever since then the human race has had a propensity to make bad choices haven’t we?

The result of that first bad choice was disconnection. The Bible says that the choice to disobey God caused us to be disconnected from God, from the earth, and each other. The results of that choice were devastating. I don’t think we fully appreciate the effects of that choice because we never experienced the world before that choice.

Anyway, here’s where the Christian perspective on choice comes in. Orthodox Christianity teaches us that God was distraught about the position in which we found ourselves. God loves us and wants a relationship with us like he had with the first people. But ever since then, we’ve rejected him in favor of ourselves.

This is where Jesus comes in. God sent Jesus to restore the relationships that were broken because of that first choice. Jesus came to teach us how to live lives where our relationships with God, the earth, and each other are restored. Then he willingly died on our behalf restoring those relationships and his resurrection is the evidence that he accomplished what he came to do.

Now for a moment, suppose the biblical story is true. Suppose that God really created people. Suppose God loves us and desperately wants a relationship with us. Suppose that the bad choices we make prevent that and all of our relationships. Suppose that Jesus came, lived, died, and rose again to restore those relationships. Suppose that following Jesus with your whole life would allow you to experience those restored relationships. Wouldn’t that be pretty cool? If that were true, wouldn’t you want to experience that? If that were true, wouldn’t you want everyone you know and love to experience that?

Those of us who call ourselves Christians, Christ-followers, Jesus-freaks, or whatever other Facebook moniker is in vogue today believe that this whole story is true. Speaking for myself; I’ve experienced it. I believe with all that I am that this story is true. Because I’ve experienced this, I want everyone to experience it. I think following Jesus (or choosing not to) is the most important choice in life.

Now back to the misguided judgmental Christians that prompted these questions and indirectly this blog post. It is wrong to look down on other people because they don’t choose to follow Jesus. It is wrong to look down on other people because the choose to follow Jesus differently. It is wrong to look down on people because of the choices they make. It’s even wrong to look down on people because they choose to be Buckeye fans. (That joke makes more sense if you live in Ann Arbor.) At the same time, it’s a very human act to look down on people who choose differently from us. We look down on people who choose different political parties than us. We look down on people who choose to drive different cars than us. We look down on people who support different sports teams than us. We look down on people who make different faith choices than us. It’s not OK. It’s not right. But it is true.

It is also very human to overcome our human limitations. I think that’s why I like the Olympics so much. I get to see people overcoming human limitations to do something extraordinary. Oscar Pistroius from South Africa is a perfect example of this. A double amputee overcame not just physical limitations but cultural limitations of bigotry and mistrust and ran in the Olympics. He is one of my heroes.

In a less spectacular way there are Christians overcoming our human limitations and learning not to look down on people who choose differently than us. Agape Ann Arbor is a community of people trying to do that. We are a group of people that are trying to truly live the way that Jesus lives and love the way that Jesus loves.

As I close this incredibly long-winded post, I’d like to say one more thing. Remember, Christians believe that choosing to follow Jesus is the best choice anyone can make. While many people do a poor job communicating this out, encouraging someone to follow Jesus is truly an act of love. If you believed Christianity were true, wouldn’t you want other people to experience it too?

I believe the story of Jesus is true. I believe that following Jesus is the best choice anyone can make. I would love for you to choose to follow Jesus. But ultimately, I respect your choice.