grief

Can’t Avoid Death or Taxes

This is a continuation of a series we started last week answering questions I solicited from friends on Facebook. This week’s question: Why do people die?

Celtic Graveyard

I think it’s important to remember, we weren’t created to die. We were created to live forever in a perfect relationship with God, the earth, and each other. The issue of death is closely related to the issue of choice that we discussed last week.

The first humans were living in a pure relationship with God, the earth, and each other. God gave them the gift of free choice. In the middle of the Garden of Eden the symbol of that choice was the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. God gave the people the fruit of every tree in the garden for food. The only prohibition God had placed on them was that they could not eat the fruit from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. The penalty for choosing to eat from that tree was death.

I know, that seems harsh, right?

It seems really harsh to me, anyway. It helps, however, to understand what the Bible says the nature of death is and why that choice merited such a penalty according to the Bible.

Death at it’s core is separation. That’s what makes it so painful isn’t it? When someone we love dies we feel that separation deeply. We feel loss. While the feelings are different because the stakes are different we feel loss and grieve anytime we loose something. When a pet dies, a dream dies, or a relationship dies, we feel loss. We feel pain.

When the first people at that fruit they died. Immediately they were separated from God, the earth, and each other. The first thing they did after they ate was hide from each other. They made clothes to hide their nakedness from each other. In the very next scene we find them hiding from God.

This all resulted from the choice they made to eat that fruit. Why did they eat that fruit? Life was good. All their needs were provided for. They were content. Then someone deceived them. They were told that something was missing in life. They were told that God was holding out on them. They were convinced that life wasn’t as good as it could be. They were told they could “be like God knowing good and evil.”

It wasn’t a lie. God knew the difference between good and evil. He had experienced it firsthand when one of his closest friends, the angel Lucifer, betrayed him. After eating the fruit, the first humans knew the difference too. They had first-hand experience of evil. They betrayed the God who loved him and suddenly, they knew evil. And they died. They were separated from God, the earth, and each other.

According to the Bible God is the source of life. He created life. He breathed the “breath of life” into the first human. The ultimate fulfillment of our separation from God, the source of life, is physical death.

That’s a very truncated answer. There’s a lot more that can be said and I’m happy to converse more with you about this in the comments if you’re interested. But, I’d be remiss if I didn’t add one more thing. Physical death isn’t necessarily the end. The story of Jesus is that he conquered death. By conquering death for himself, he conquered it for all of us. The Bible says that through Jesus our relationships with God, the earth, and each other can all be restored and we can receive what the Bible refers to as eternal life.