Monthly Archives: September 2012

Announcing Bible and a Brew

Our Bible and a Brew website launched yesterday. We’re launching Bible and a Brew because we believe the most important thing we can do as a community is build relationships.

Bible and a Brew is an opportunity for people to share a good drink and a good conversation about faith, philosophy, theology, and life. Bible and a Brew developed out of a conversation between Bryon and Jennifer Harvey from Agape Ann Arbor. They wanted to provide a place where people could talk openly and honestly and ask real questions without feeling like they were being judged.

Bryon and Jennifer then asked, “Where do the best conversations occur?” It seems the best conversations occur over a drink. The best conversations always seem to occur when the people have a coffee or a beer in their hand.

Bible and a Brew was born.

So whether your favorite brew is dark roast coffee or a dark lager, we hope you’ll join us for Bible and a Brew. Go to BibleAndABrew.com and choose your favorite brew to get more information.

Ending Hunger One Step at a Time

We’re taking a break from the question series to talk about an event in which we’re participating. The Interfaith Council for Justice and Peace is sponsoring the 2012 CROP Hunger Walk. Last year proceeds from the Walk supported local organizations such as the St. Andrew’s Breakfast Program, Avalon Housing, Hope Clinic, Catholic Social Services, and many more.

The vision of Agape Ann Arbor is to be a community experiencing and expressing God’s love. I can’t think of many ways better to express God’s love than by providing someone’s most basic needs. Feeding the hungry is one of the most fundamental ways to express God’s love.

If you take a look in the Bible, you can see God feeding the hungry over and over again. In the very beginning God created the world including plants that produced food for people. He told Adam and Eve that he had provided that food for them (Genesis 2:16). After God freed the nation of Israel from slavery in Egypt, he provided food for them in the desert (Exodus 16). In forming the legal code for Israel God commanded that farmers leave some of their produce in the fields for the poor to harvest so no one would go hungry in Israel (Leviticus 19:9-10 et. al.). Jesus continues this example of feeding the hungry. Twice he stopped what he was doing to feed the people following him (Mark 6:30-39; 8:1-13 and parallels). Jesus said, moreover, that feeding the hungry is one of the expectations of those who are following him; living in his kingdom (Matthew 25:31-46).

We, therefore, are putting our love into action and doing something small to feed the hungry. We would love for you to be a part of our team. If you would like to make a difference and feed the hungry with us go to our team page for the walk and join our team or donate to our team to help us reach our goal.

In the Name of Love

We’re continuing our blog series answering questions that people have asked us. This week we’re taking a break from the theological to answer a more practical question. Why do we call ourselves Agape Ann Arbor? This is probably the easiest question to answer of them all.

The vision of Agape Ann Arbor is to be a community experiencing and expressing God’s love. The foundation of this vision comes from something that Jesus said to his followers the night before he was executed. He said that he was giving them a new command, a new way of life, they were to love each other in the same way that he loved them. Then he said that the world would know they were his followers by their love for one another. In other words, people looking at this new community built around the example and teachings of Jesus would know who they were by the way the experience and express God’s love. The one distinguishing characteristic of Jesus-followers is not what they do on Sunday, who they vote for, what music they listen to, or what books they read. The distinguishing characteristic of Jesus-followers is how they love.

I don’t mean to be overly harsh or critical here but if you call yourself a Jesus-follower and you’re not known for how you love people, you are not following Jesus.

So, back to the name. You didn’t think I forgot did you. That wasn’t some wild ranting rabbit trail. It’s all connected.

Agape, pronounced ah-GAH-pay, is a Greek word that means unconditional love. For the ancient Greeks, agape was the highest possible form of love. The New Testament authors used the word agape to describe the love of God; unconditional, unrelenting, unending, love. We are a community in Ann Arbor seeking to experience and express God’s love. We are Agape Ann Arbor.

Christian Recruiting

At lunch the other day, a friend asked me an interesting question. He asked, “Why do you feel the need to recruit?” Here’s my favorite thing about his question. He used the word recruit. I’ve never heard it put that way before. I’ve heard evangelism (the Christian term of which no one seems to know the definition), outreach (an equally vague bit of Christian jargon), and proselytize (typically used pejoratively by people who are not Christian). But, I’d never heard recruit used in that context before.

As a member of the Michigan Air National Guard, I have a specific view of recruiting. It generally involves a young naive person who is looking for purpose and a job. Someone in a uniform (The Marines always have the advantage at this point.), extols the virtues of serving in the (insert branch of service here) and tries to get them to enlist. The goal for US Military recruiters is to fill the ranks of the US Military.

Living within walking distance of the University of Michigan I’m exposed to another view of recruiting. The NCAA Division I football coach. This conjures up thoughts of middle-aged men with personalities too big for their bodies wearing polo shirts enticing young naive boys to play football at (insert school here). The goal of the college football coach is to get the best talent possible to win football games.

We Christ-followers recruit too. The uniform is different. The recruits are often different. But, most importantly, the motivation is different. When someone chooses to follow Jesus, I get no direct benefit.

OK, you might argue that I get the benefit of people attending Agape Ann Arbor. That’s a fair critique. So, let me answer that before I explain my motivation. First, there is no prerequisite to attend an Agape Ann Arbor gathering. We don’t care what you believe. You’re welcome to hang with. Everyone is welcome. Second for a lot of people who decide to follow Jesus, Agape Ann Arbor isn’t a good fit for them. They’re looking for a church experience very different from our community gatherings. They’re looking for a more typical expression of American church. Agape Ann Arbor is anything but the typical expression of American church. I have a lot of friends who are pastors of different churches. I’m happy to connect new Christ-followers with those communities.

Truly, I don’t get a direct benefit from someone choosing to follow Jesus. So, why do I do it? There are three specific reasons:

First, Jesus changed my life. Jesus has given me direction and a purpose. Through Jesus I experience God’s love. This is the most meaningful thing in my life. I honestly believe that everyone who follows Jesus will have this same transcendant experience. I love people. I want people to be all that God has created them to be and I think that can only happen through Jesus. So, I share Jesus with people hoping they will follow him.

Second, I believe in a literal heaven and hell. I know that’s not a popular belief. According to the statistics I’ve read, I’m in the minority. That’s OK. It’s still true of me. I believe that people have the choice to experience heaven now and forever through Jesus or experience hell now and forever without him. Since I believe this to be true, I believe I would be the biggest selfish jerk on the planet if I didn’t share Jesus.

Third, one of the last things Jesus said to his followers after his resurrection and before he ascended into heaven was to go make disciples. Jesus literally told his followers to go recruit followers. I love Jesus. If you love someone, you do what they ask as a loving response. Since I love Jesus, I do what he asked me to do.

I feel like there’s one thing I need to add to this. People are not projects. I don’t make friends with people to “get them in.” I make friends with people because I love people. If my friends never choose to follow Jesus, it makes me sad because of what I believe about him. But that doesn’t change how I feel or what I believe about them.

If you’re my friend. You’re my friend because I love you and like hanging out with you. Your choice to follow Jesus or not is your choice. That’s between you and Jesus. It does not change the fact that you’re my friend.